Category Archives: blogs

It’s 3.20am and I’m blogging

I’ve had one of those nights when I went to bed early, especially to wake refreshed tomorrow, but instead my mind has been crazy. I guess in this time of lockdowns, and dire economic predictions, I’m not the only one to have become a night owl.

Above: Coffins being buried in New York City will continue to bring huge grief, to family members who survived, for decades to come.

The future and how it will affect us is unknown. Even those who profess to know, can’t or won’t tell us how much and how bad. Things have changed so. Jobs that once were sugar coated managerial positions are out the door and the former employees are off to food parcel lines; those we have often seen near the bottom of the desirable career choices are still happily in work.

  • The streets are still being cleaned and rubbish collected – those workers are getting paid as usual.
  • Couriers are even busier as the population takes to online ordering and delivery.
  • Local bus drivers are only now coming back to work, while tourist drivers are hanging up their Passenger Licences and seeking jobs elsewhere.
  • Farmers are okay as long as they can book their produce into the meat works or take delivery of the feed products they need.
  • Food providers and cafes are trying any delivery method they can to get their food products into the eager, junk food starved hands of people who still have a job.

Living (if you’ve avoided the death knell of Covid-19) just got a whole lot more topsy-turvy.

The land of plenty isn’t anymore

What I can’t believe is the short-sightedness of rioting crowds in the US demanding that they be allowed back to work. Now they may all be herd immunity believers and willing to risk shortening their lives, and those of their families, by going back to sharing spit.  But is that belief really fair on the rest of us who are playing by the rules?

I understand their fear of poverty might seem more important to them, and the risk of death by Covid-19 far less immediate. But take a look at this family reported on CNN in mid-March:  https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/19/health/new-jersey-coronavirus-family-members-killed/index.html

I bet their family dinner never figured to them as a last supper.

Over-reaction save lives

There is so much debate in social media about the over-reaction (or lack of action) of health authorities. Armchair critics have the comfort of being able to gripe without ever risking their necks. The fact is over-reaction and strict lockdown rules will never be proved wrong. There is no way you can count who might have died if the government of the day had not enforced a rigid lockdown. However, countries where governments did not react fast enough are counting their dead.

And the lack of herd immunity because we haven’t all suffered Covid-19 (and therefore are still at risk of catching the lurgy) is only a small fear when you hear the tales from people who have suffered serious bouts. Roll on the vaccines

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

We are star dust and space

It’s amazing, isn’t it? How we are in awe of the heavens, the stars, the collections of them in the Milky Way? We lean back and stare and wonder where “it” ever ends.

For that is a human condition: to look for limitation.

A NASA view of the Milky Way

How we learn limitation

We start as infants stressing about when our mother is there or not there and move onto larger things such as whether our sibling will eat more of the favourite pudding than we will get. There is always limitation – a limited amount to go around.

Then we are loaded with the stress of success.

  • Are we going to pass that dance or music exam, make the team (after all there are only 4/11/15 places)? Can we win this job because there are not many other jobs going?
  • We limit ourselves by stressing about costs. We only have a limited amount of money.
  • We limit ourselves by stressing about friendships. There are only a few people around who meet our expectations of “worth having as a friend”.

Universe too large for our limits

So when we stare in awe at the stars we are flummoxed by the enormity of the universes it contains. We cannot comprehend how something might have no beginning and no end. It must have been created by “some THING”, we think. And then: if “some THING” created this endless galaxy of stars, where does IT exist?

Human research has uncovered much of the universe that exists within us, right down to particles within atoms, the communication between cells, and the space between them. And here again we encounter a mystery: if space exists between every particle, every atom, every cell, we must all be connected by … space. There is nothing that limits my space from your space – only our belief that within my skin I am “me” and within your skin you are “you”.

The atmosphere is no protection

At this point, we must not deceive ourselves into believing in separation (limitation) from the heavens by defining atmosphere as “not space” and beyond our planet as “space”. Space is simply an area where objects of any kind do not exist. Even this is too simplistic a definition because star dust or cosmic dust “from out there” exists in space as groupings of a few molecules to much larger particles.

Our atmosphere, that we see as separated from space, does not protect us from up to 40,000 tons of space dust that settles on our planet every year (see here).

Therefore star dust reaches through space to our planet. Our internal spaces, however, connect outward into the space around our planet and that connects with the space in our solar system and that connects to interstellar space – so we are all one.

Now, there’s a concept bound to challenge our brains built on limiting beliefs.

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

How Do Authors Become Known?

 

This morning I continued my research into how authors manage to promote their writing. First destination was Goodreads, which I registered for as a reader several years ago and rarely visit.

How do authors use Goodreads?

I got there after looking up about Auckland author Tina Clough, after seeing her comments about her favourite books in the Press (Saturday, August 5, 2017, p17). She is featured on Goodreads after the publication of her newest book: The Chinese Proverb.

This is Tina’s third novel posted on Goodreads. She has been a member since August 2013 about the time she published her first novel: The Girl Who Lived Twice. Her novels have been reviewed/commented on by 9 reviewers, but I was unable to read the reviews (there must be a way, but this technically challenged author (me) couldn’t find the right link).

What I discovered about Goodreads, thanks to Tina, was that authors have a number of ways to promote themselves on Goodreads:

  • You can blog
  • You can publicise your website
  • You can list your own book (books) as ones you are reading so it appear on lists
  • And you can add events (book launches/interviews/podcasts etc)

5000-strong support group

I was sure there were other ways to advance yourself as an author. So I went looking at other authors who wanted to ‘connect’ with me (I told you it was a long time since I’d visited).

I found out that Goodreads has a ‘group’ that is a Showcase for Readers and Writers. Within this community authors can bring a little hype about who they are and what they have recently published. It may be talking amongst yourselves, but who knows who might be reading!

Goodreads also sponsor a Support For Indie Authors website: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/154447-support-for-indie-authors

This is already in the 5000 plus membership range, but for $US12 per year shares a mass of information.

New Zealand support

In New Zealand author support comes in bucket-loads from the New Zealand Society of Authors (linked to the international organisation PEN). This organisation will publish a a supplied review of your work and share it with members on the month it is selected. The lists are accessed here:  http://authors.org.nz/writers/new-books/

Writers who belong to NZSA can be searched and I found a long time friend and children’s author, Helen McKinley, whose ‘Grandma’ series has been delighting children for a decade.

The NZSA now supports authors who are self-published and /or are eBook authors. In doing a search for my own name I discovered that I have not entered any information and I’m missing a huge opportunity. That will be rectified promptly.

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Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

Finding the Write Road

Musings by Heather Sylvawood

This morning started with a bit of a hiccup – I had a flat battery. The car I am currently driving doesn’t have mod-cons like warning beeps if you turn off the car while the lights are still on. It does, in fact, assume you will be vigilant and remember … duh!

batteryDEAD

Once the battery issue was solved by the nice young man from AA, I set off.

Now I don’t usually drive a manual. Anyone driving behind me could probably tell. I often manage to confuse the slot for third gear with the slot for fifth gear. Consequently I’m either over-revving or stuttering under the strain of a gear jump.

All of these faux pas instantly connect with the blood supply to my face.

Battering my self-confidence

Taking the back route (less chance of shaming myself in front of others), I rattled along, berating myself for every mistake and generally giving my self-confidence I right battering.

Then, in one of those break-through moments, I realised that this is what I do when I’m writing! I leap forward and write heaps, and then I re-read and start to doubt myself, comparing my first draft writing with the polished published writing of others. I compare my least polished with their pristine.

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Recently I have been reading a selection of writers – the series writer, romance writers, mystery writers, New Zealand writers, and Christian writers. I find myself picking up proofing errors (ahhh … the permanency of print against eBooks) and even clumsy language which their editors surely should have noticed. What’s been happening to me is I have been developing my critical eye. Only this time it isn’t for my own work but for that of others.

The Critical Eye is valuable

I am beginning to realise that my over-revving and stuttering gait probably mirrors that of other writers. They too must feel  lacking when comparing themselves to the honoured writers of our culture. That critical eye, however, is what keeps writers improving.

As well as noting the less-than-perfect, the joy of my research is that I am also identifying clever writing.

I recently read Tiger Lillie by Lisa Samson, a Christian writer living in Maryland, USA. I love her style. She manages to convey so much more in simple descriptions and with such humour, I want to come back for more. Take the following example:

“I’ve always loved evening. Even back then, as a chubby, bug-eyed little girl who also loved a good joke, that time of day sobered me and filled me with peace. I know now it’s due to the fact that the clock never stops ticking down and the time for making the day’s mistakes draws to a sweet close. Even the circumstances in which to make these blunders fly away, for in the twilight we simply sit and breathe quietly, cross our fingers and hope the phone won’t ring or the Jehovah’s Witnesses won’t come to the door.”

What craft! How much does she reveal about her character in a passage ostensibly about ‘evening’?

Research good writer and author examples

By reading the work of others I am observing the unusual word construction, the insightful capture of character, and the clever development of plot.

Research is important, be that by reading the work of others, or finding out what is capturing the readers of the day. Writing, however, is the key to becoming a writer. So it’s back to the computer for me.

Oh! Yes. I am writing. A blog!

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

Hooking in your readers

I’ve been a bit slack with my writing over the last two years. It was something to do with moving house and total renovations, not just in one house – but two. Sort of puts you off your stride in the writing market.

TobyRedecorating

Above: Toby our dog didn’t understand about wet paint!

Serious writing

To prepare myself to take up serious writing again I decided to research what other writers are doing to capture and satisfy their readers and create a new market. What I have found is:

  • In fantasy, suspense and romance creating a series is the way to go. That means a commitment, not just to writing a lot, but to planning ahead so that your characters can jump the divide between books AND your endings leave an exciting urge in your readers to discover what happens next.

Serious focus

The writers with such a long term plan must be disciplined. I tend to follow the most recent idea in my head instead of planning for the book after next. I’ve read enough How-to books to know this is a system doomed to failure in the competitive field of online writing, for instance: Let’s Get Digital: How to Self-Publish And Why You Should, by David Gaughran. But does that convince me to be more focussed? Nah! Well not yet, anyway. Perhaps this year will be different.

Serious money

If my plan to make some serious money self-publishing on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and possibly Kobo, then more discipline is required. I also need to catch-up on what is happening in the self-publishing world, such as the ever-changing rules around Smashwords and Amazon. The field is so constantly changing that books I downloaded on the subject two years ago are already out-of-date.

Another area I need to uncover the secrets of is how to encourage readers to leave reviews of books so that  new readers are drawn into my readership. All this learning and I still have to motivate myself to write more and faster.

Anyone else have any experience of these dilemmas?

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author