Category Archives: Self-publishing

Review: Scarlet and Magenta

Scarlet and Magenta is a recently released historical novel by New Zealander Lindsey Dawson writing about Victorian times in the country’s (then) remote township of Tauranga.

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Reading an historical novel as a woman entrenched in feminist beliefs is a challenge. You want the hero(ine)s to succeed against the entrenched patriarchal beliefs even though you know that likelihood is zilch. I imagine writing such a novel is equally frustrating because of the limitations of historical accuracy.

Colonial wives and lives curbed

Dawson, however, empathetically strides alongside her two colonial wives as they grapple with the understanding that their gender renders them silent in the decisions about  life. Even in the sphere of domestic and cultural pursuits, their production is monitored and curbed by husbands and society’s beliefs.

Violet’s past haunts her while her ambitious husband bullies her almost into submission. Anna has a more magnanimous husband and her rebellion is less dramatic than Violet’s.

My reservations

The character of Rupert is developed through the eyes of the two women and Anna’s husband. I felt this hampered a full rounding out of a charming man bent on self-destruction. 

I loved the book, but I felt that Dawson hurried the conclusion. Although the plot  ends are tied up nicely, by using a jump forward in time, I believe that a little more unfolding of the story could well  keep the reader enthralled.

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

How Do Authors Become Known?

 

This morning I continued my research into how authors manage to promote their writing. First destination was Goodreads, which I registered for as a reader several years ago and rarely visit.

How do authors use Goodreads?

I got there after looking up about Auckland author Tina Clough, after seeing her comments about her favourite books in the Press (Saturday, August 5, 2017, p17). She is featured on Goodreads after the publication of her newest book: The Chinese Proverb.

This is Tina’s third novel posted on Goodreads. She has been a member since August 2013 about the time she published her first novel: The Girl Who Lived Twice. Her novels have been reviewed/commented on by 9 reviewers, but I was unable to read the reviews (there must be a way, but this technically challenged author (me) couldn’t find the right link).

What I discovered about Goodreads, thanks to Tina, was that authors have a number of ways to promote themselves on Goodreads:

  • You can blog
  • You can publicise your website
  • You can list your own book (books) as ones you are reading so it appear on lists
  • And you can add events (book launches/interviews/podcasts etc)

5000-strong support group

I was sure there were other ways to advance yourself as an author. So I went looking at other authors who wanted to ‘connect’ with me (I told you it was a long time since I’d visited).

I found out that Goodreads has a ‘group’ that is a Showcase for Readers and Writers. Within this community authors can bring a little hype about who they are and what they have recently published. It may be talking amongst yourselves, but who knows who might be reading!

Goodreads also sponsor a Support For Indie Authors website: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/154447-support-for-indie-authors

This is already in the 5000 plus membership range, but for $US12 per year shares a mass of information.

New Zealand support

In New Zealand author support comes in bucket-loads from the New Zealand Society of Authors (linked to the international organisation PEN). This organisation will publish a a supplied review of your work and share it with members on the month it is selected. The lists are accessed here:  http://authors.org.nz/writers/new-books/

Writers who belong to NZSA can be searched and I found a long time friend and children’s author, Helen McKinley, whose ‘Grandma’ series has been delighting children for a decade.

The NZSA now supports authors who are self-published and /or are eBook authors. In doing a search for my own name I discovered that I have not entered any information and I’m missing a huge opportunity. That will be rectified promptly.

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Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

Finding the Write Road

Musings by Heather Sylvawood

This morning started with a bit of a hiccup – I had a flat battery. The car I am currently driving doesn’t have mod-cons like warning beeps if you turn off the car while the lights are still on. It does, in fact, assume you will be vigilant and remember … duh!

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Once the battery issue was solved by the nice young man from AA, I set off.

Now I don’t usually drive a manual. Anyone driving behind me could probably tell. I often manage to confuse the slot for third gear with the slot for fifth gear. Consequently I’m either over-revving or stuttering under the strain of a gear jump.

All of these faux pas instantly connect with the blood supply to my face.

Battering my self-confidence

Taking the back route (less chance of shaming myself in front of others), I rattled along, berating myself for every mistake and generally giving my self-confidence I right battering.

Then, in one of those break-through moments, I realised that this is what I do when I’m writing! I leap forward and write heaps, and then I re-read and start to doubt myself, comparing my first draft writing with the polished published writing of others. I compare my least polished with their pristine.

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Recently I have been reading a selection of writers – the series writer, romance writers, mystery writers, New Zealand writers, and Christian writers. I find myself picking up proofing errors (ahhh … the permanency of print against eBooks) and even clumsy language which their editors surely should have noticed. What’s been happening to me is I have been developing my critical eye. Only this time it isn’t for my own work but for that of others.

The Critical Eye is valuable

I am beginning to realise that my over-revving and stuttering gait probably mirrors that of other writers. They too must feel  lacking when comparing themselves to the honoured writers of our culture. That critical eye, however, is what keeps writers improving.

As well as noting the less-than-perfect, the joy of my research is that I am also identifying clever writing.

I recently read Tiger Lillie by Lisa Samson, a Christian writer living in Maryland, USA. I love her style. She manages to convey so much more in simple descriptions and with such humour, I want to come back for more. Take the following example:

“I’ve always loved evening. Even back then, as a chubby, bug-eyed little girl who also loved a good joke, that time of day sobered me and filled me with peace. I know now it’s due to the fact that the clock never stops ticking down and the time for making the day’s mistakes draws to a sweet close. Even the circumstances in which to make these blunders fly away, for in the twilight we simply sit and breathe quietly, cross our fingers and hope the phone won’t ring or the Jehovah’s Witnesses won’t come to the door.”

What craft! How much does she reveal about her character in a passage ostensibly about ‘evening’?

Research good writer and author examples

By reading the work of others I am observing the unusual word construction, the insightful capture of character, and the clever development of plot.

Research is important, be that by reading the work of others, or finding out what is capturing the readers of the day. Writing, however, is the key to becoming a writer. So it’s back to the computer for me.

Oh! Yes. I am writing. A blog!

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

Hooking in your readers

I’ve been a bit slack with my writing over the last two years. It was something to do with moving house and total renovations, not just in one house – but two. Sort of puts you off your stride in the writing market.

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Above: Toby our dog didn’t understand about wet paint!

Serious writing

To prepare myself to take up serious writing again I decided to research what other writers are doing to capture and satisfy their readers and create a new market. What I have found is:

  • In fantasy, suspense and romance creating a series is the way to go. That means a commitment, not just to writing a lot, but to planning ahead so that your characters can jump the divide between books AND your endings leave an exciting urge in your readers to discover what happens next.

Serious focus

The writers with such a long term plan must be disciplined. I tend to follow the most recent idea in my head instead of planning for the book after next. I’ve read enough How-to books to know this is a system doomed to failure in the competitive field of online writing, for instance: Let’s Get Digital: How to Self-Publish And Why You Should, by David Gaughran. But does that convince me to be more focussed? Nah! Well not yet, anyway. Perhaps this year will be different.

Serious money

If my plan to make some serious money self-publishing on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and possibly Kobo, then more discipline is required. I also need to catch-up on what is happening in the self-publishing world, such as the ever-changing rules around Smashwords and Amazon. The field is so constantly changing that books I downloaded on the subject two years ago are already out-of-date.

Another area I need to uncover the secrets of is how to encourage readers to leave reviews of books so that  new readers are drawn into my readership. All this learning and I still have to motivate myself to write more and faster.

Anyone else have any experience of these dilemmas?

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

An Opportunity for NZ Authors in Print

NZ Bookshop Day: seeking authors!

Bookshops are keen to have authors in store on NZ Bookshop Day – Saturday October 31. Whether it be a book signing, launch of a new book, a reading, or just dropping in for a chat and an opportunity for book buyers to meet their local authors. This is a great day for authors to connect with their local bookshop. The day has been established to celebrate the great local bookstores in New Zealand.

Bookstores must have their events registered by October 1st in order to join the nation-wide event so if you have a book possibility (signing, give-away, competition idea) get hold of your local NZ bookstore and talk to them about it. To check out the website GO HERE.

Photo Competition

There is also a photo competition for the best picture of someone reading a book anywhere in New Zealand. Check out the competition page here. At risk of disqualifying myself from entering I would like to share this picture of my daughter reading many years ago.

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In the US, May is the month for Indie Bookstores (as opposed to book seller chains) to celebrate authors. Bookshops who participated reported huge increases in foot traffic, so if you’re an author of print books get on the phone and see if you can take advantage of this nation-wide event.

Heather Sylvawood – Amazon Author