Category Archives: Marketing

An Opportunity for NZ Authors in Print

NZ Bookshop Day: seeking authors!

Bookshops are keen to have authors in store on NZ Bookshop Day – Saturday October 31. Whether it be a book signing, launch of a new book, a reading, or just dropping in for a chat and an opportunity for book buyers to meet their local authors. This is a great day for authors to connect with their local bookshop. The day has been established to celebrate the great local bookstores in New Zealand.

Bookstores must have their events registered by October 1st in order to join the nation-wide event so if you have a book possibility (signing, give-away, competition idea) get hold of your local NZ bookstore and talk to them about it. To check out the website GO HERE.

Photo Competition

There is also a photo competition for the best picture of someone reading a book anywhere in New Zealand. Check out the competition page here. At risk of disqualifying myself from entering I would like to share this picture of my daughter reading many years ago.

NessReading

In the US, May is the month for Indie Bookstores (as opposed to book seller chains) to celebrate authors. Bookshops who participated reported huge increases in foot traffic, so if you’re an author of print books get on the phone and see if you can take advantage of this nation-wide event.

Heather Sylvawood – Amazon Author

Discover Quality NZ Authors

While attending a Writers’ Forum in Picton – a picturesque Port and marina in New Zealand, I was able to share experiences with a number of self-published authors.

HeatherReadingWalkingOnIce      

Above: (Left) Me – Heather Sylvawood – absorbed in Walking on Ice by Emma Stevens; (right) Mike Ponder’s ”could-be-true” conspiracy novel about the Royal Family

Seriously good authors

Without exception the writers who attended the Picton Forum related difficulties over being taken seriously as writers of quality books. They all acknowledged that at the beginning of the Indie (Self) Publishing emergence there were books published that really required hard editing to bring them up to the standard of print-based books, but now, unfortunately, quality books are reaching the online shelves without a whisper of recognition.

What does it take to prove quality in writing?

And if you prove it – what then?

How can New Zealand author’s become recognised in their own country against the well-resourced distribution houses of America?

There are some small publishers and printers in New Zealand who are attempting to right the balance, yet they too come up against the confusion over the terms ‘Vanity Publishing’ and ‘Self-publishing’. As Dave MacManus from The Copy Press, printing and publishing house, defined it: vanity publishing is done when the author wants only a printed copy of their material for limited circulation among family and friends; self-publishing is for people who have written a book for general distribution. Put like that, why has the term ‘vanity publishing’ earned such a bad rap?

The Legacy of Vanity Publishing

The quality of a self-published book is imperative if the publication is to be taken seriously out in the reading world. Unfortunately self-publishing is still tainted by the lack of editing of vanity press editions and the editing by those who climbed fortuitously on the indie-publishing scene when still in its infancy.

The indie/self and digital publishing divide

Another area of confusion about the quality of the writing in self-published books – as opposed to traditional print published books – is that self-published books are not edited before they hit the … shelves/lists. That can be a legitimate complaint. With publishing on Amazon as a Kindle eBook so simple, authors, who needed to learn better, put their drafts out for all the world to see. And some of the writing is cringe-worthy with poor grammar, spelling mistakes and general clumsy construction making the book a hard read.

Prior to publication, however, many authors  of self-published books and eBooks spend hundreds of dollars employing one or more editors to hone their story to a reputable standard. The reality is that good authors do not want to be shamed by a less than perfect product.

Print on Demand changed the publishing landscape

Not every printed book you might choose to order will necessarily have been edited and printed by a traditional publisher. Many of the soft copy books you can buy online will have been self-published. They may have been printed by a print-on-demand (POD) publisher such as CreateSpace (Amazon’s print book publisher) or Lightening Source.  POD is when a title is printed and bound, one book at a time, in response to your individual order.

Alternatively, an author might have chosen to have their book printed in a small run by a printer like The Copy Press mentioned above, and may then advertise it through online bookshops. That same author could either engage a distributor to get their title into bookshops, or trudge the country hawking their book. Okay, it’s not quite as bad as it sounds, but some writers in our Picton forum described experiences very close.

Self-promotion is an awkward companion for many writers

Coming to terms with the need for self-promotion brings blushes to faces of many authors. Writing is what they do – not marketing.  The two activities of writing and promotion are diametrically opposed – one is a solitary, introspective activity; the other forces you to engage with others (many others) and put yourself out in the world, vulnerable to criticism and judgement.

Getting out and promoting your book is hard work and you have to get over your personal fear of rejection when someone (and this is inevitable) rejects your request to buy, sell-on-behalf, stock or otherwise help you to earn some recompense for your months of hard work. Ironically, our tax department views most writers’ endeavours as a ‘hobby’ because many of us profit by only a few cents per book.

Self-promotion, though, is the only way we are going to get noticed in the over-crowded digital world. In the world of digital publishing (eBooks and POD) we really have to use the scatter-gun approach. We need to Tweet and Link-in, advertise on Facebook and our websites, blog and plain beg our friends and relatives to spread the word.

NZ Writers to Follow

Now to introduce you to a few of the writers I met over the weekend. You’ll see what a varied bunch we are.

  
1. Emma Stevens;     2. Mike Ponder;    3. Wendy Scott

1. Emma Stevens has learned by trial and error how self-promotion benefits an author. She happily takes on talks to U3A, Probus Clubs, libraries and the like, and was rewarded recently by being interviewed by the NZ Woman’s Weekly. It’s all good publicity and you get to sell copies of your book after the talk, she explained.

Her book Walking on Ice has captured the imagination of many readers in its autobiographical description of her online romance with a teacher from Alaska and their eventual return to the isolation of a school there. The story does have all the great elements for a gripping story: the apparently insurmountable odds for a romance to flourish and the heroine and hero’s sad separation, and finally their reunion in inhospitable environs of Alaska.

2. Mike Ponder is both artist and writer. His book The Windsor Conspiracy is based on popular belief/gossip, but little known suspicion, about what really moved the House of Windsor after the war years. Is Prince Charles really a Windsor? Was the Queen Mother an evil manipulator? This fast-paced thriller is based on a conspiracy behind Britain’s Royal Family.

Mike uses snatches of history, real and conjectured, to weave a mystery around what really did happy under the Queen Mother’s ‘reign’.  Watch out for the next story and review your review your understanding of who is the power behind the throne and who might be the ‘heir apparent’.

3. Wendy Scott – Surrounded by the wild West Coast is it any wonder that Wendy’s imagination gives rise to stories of magic and witches? She says of her life: “When my partner, son (5 months), dog and I moved back to NZ we lived in a house truck for 3 years while our off-the-grid house was planned and built. During this period I wrote on a solar powered laptop and completed many correspondence courses from the AWA.”

She’s a prolific writer of adult fantasy, children’s novels and now branching into romance.

More_Than_I_Could_BearFullSize

4. Suzanne Clark;   5. Tony Sandall;    6. Heather Sylvawood

4. Sue (Suzanne) Clark lives in Collingwood, Golden Bay and began writing after retiring from teaching. Sue enjoys researching her subjects and building a what-might-have-happened novel from what she uncovers. Both Awhina’s People, a pre-european story about Maori warring between tribes, and His Father’s Will, a story of one of her own forebears have been based on extensive research and interviews with those who could shed light on early events.  Mrs Lacy, however, draws on her knowledge of living in a small community, like the environs of Golden Bay.

5. Tony Sandall – horse trainer extraordinaire has written a non-fiction, how-to book in which he shares the learning of a life time,

“My method teaches you to work with your horse through the early kindergarten months so he becomes quiet and obedient in all circumstances, ready to move on to whatever discipline you ask of him,” says Tony.

It’s one of those must have books for serious riders trying to correct a bad habit in their mount, and those who are schooling a young horse. “Essentially, the method involves the use of a specially designed strap or rope to restrict the movements of the horse during the early teaching process.”

6. Heather Sylvawood – (And this is me unashamedly promoting myself!) I call myself an emerging Amazon writer and publish most of my work as Kindle eBooks. I started with non-fiction, moved into children’s stories written to be read by adults, short stories for adults and finally I have one published novel – More Than I could Bear – A Lesbian Affair. The story, set in the 1970s, follows Laura and Anna who are both the main carers for their autistic daughters. The story relates the many ways families cope with the effect of lost hope, stress and depression caused when a family member has an intellectual disability. Its shocking climax illustrates the tragedy of women left unsupported in an age when disability was a hidden phenomena.

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

How It Feels To Be An Author

… at last!

I have just watched a video of Joanna Penn (www.thecreativepenn.com) talking about publishing her first novel (she had previously published a non-fiction book). The watching of it brought back to me some of my own feelings on self-publishing my first books.

One of my overriding emotions on publishing my first book (non-fiction – Real Estate Rollercoaster) was one of FEAR – fear of failure, fear of rejection, fear of a flood of emails pointing out errors in the book. The last two didn’t happen, probably because the first one did. Real Estate Rollercoaster never got climbed the first  loop.

Like many authors I thought the mere publication of my masterpiece was sufficient for the world to recognise the gems I was sharing with the public and it would be an instant best seller. Uh, huh!

RERC_frontpage

Self-publishing is a rollercoaster ride

Far from being an even playing field, self-publishing is a minefield of craters into which the ignorant and naïve will fall unless they are prepared to educate themselves into the new realm of marketing eBooks and publishing on demand. I am a long way from being a master, in fact, I’m probably not even a mistress of the marketing game. I am LEARNING. Which is why I spend time listening to other self-published authors to find out how they do it.

I’ve been snatching moments this week to listen to some podcasts put together by Chandler Bolt, creator of Self-publishing School, as he talks to various other successful authors about ‘How-to’ write, publish and market your book.

JoannaPennVideo

In one of the interviews Joanna Penn says that the writing of fiction is hard work and tiring; you gain a sense of achievement at the end but you might have to resort to eating lots of cake in order to get over how tiring writing is. I totally concur. I have had to resort to chewing gum in order to avoid the cake.

Even the act of blogging can be tiring when you’re concentrating on making your blog fun, informative and worthwhile. Every word counts.

Rollercoaster ride of emotions

Monica Marlowe relates a feeling tantamount to depression after publication of her debut novel, Finding Felicity:  “My debut novel had been released in August and the excitement I felt at its release was euphoric. I was so lucky to be published and learning the ropes as a new author was exhilarating. But as summer moved into fall and winter, the fever pitch took on colder pall….. I wondered, could it be post-publication depression?”

In her Blog HERE Monica relates her surprise and disappointments about the way her friends received her foray into novel-writing. I can relate to many of her experiences, as I am sure other newly published authors will.

An acquaintance of mine was worried about how her friends and people who knew her would react after reading her work. I relate to that too. Although most novels are not strictly autobiographical, the ideas in them come out of your brain; the characters often reflect what you think or feel about issues; and if you write sex scenes – of course you will believe the reader will think you ‘do it’ that way. Actually, if you’ve written a quality novel, the reader will be so engrossed in what the CHARACTERS are doing they won’t even be aware of you – the author.

Like a painter who doesn’t believe their painting is worth anything until someone buys it, authors too feel their books are second-rate unless lots of people read them. And that’s where writers come unstuck in their self-belief when they self-publish. They have no way of finding out what people think about the book until they get reviews. And even if they get reviews they might get BAD reviews (or simply reviews that complain that you have your book in the wrong category – as I received).

Writing is only a 1/3 of the rollercoaster ride

You may experience fear, or euphoria, exhaustion or sleeplessness. Chuck Wendig, novelist, screenwriter, and game designer, says in his blog HERE:

“So, you just had your book published. … And you want to know what’s going to happen now. Here is — roughly, potentially, maybe — one scenario.

“For a variable amount of time, let’s call it a week, you’re going to be flying high. Hell, flying high doesn’t even cover it. You’re going to be flitting around the big blue heavens with a pair of magical laser dolphins as shoes. You’re going to be past the moon. You’re going to feel like you’re snorting comet dust and making sweet love to asteroids.

Because you wrote a thing.”

Well, Chuck may be exaggerating a little. For most of us thirsty firsties we’re out there panting for some recognition and the publishing rollercoaster keeps roaring by.

“Excuse me! Here! Did you read my book? Did anyone read my book?”

Surviving the fall

The only way I managed to survive the tiny plop of my first novel was that I was already almost finished my second and had already started on the sequel for novel 1. I’d also read a lot of blogs and viewed many videos on marketing eBooks and self-published novels.

Marketing and promoting your book takes a lot longer than you anticipate if you’re a thirsty firsty. You might even be completely turned off writing more books if you wait around for positive feedback from the amorphous cloud of readers following popular fiction.

I knew that popularity was not going to arrive with novel 1, nor probably with novel 2 … 3 …. 4. It would be only when I had an out-there profile and people accidentally came across my work, read it (in a weak moment), liked it and looked for more, that I would become better known. I also had to wait until friends read it (and they don’t read your novel when, or as quickly as you would like/expect) and then fed back to their friends about the quality of the writing.

It all takes time – and unfortunately that’s time away from writing your next blockbuster. But then … isn’t blogging ‘writing’? Don’t you also develop a personality, a sense of accomplishment AND writing technique from blogging? It’s sometimes harder work than allowing the creative flow to surge words onto the screen or paper.

The Last Word in Self-publishing

I’ll leave Joanna Penn to tell you how it is that even successfully-published writers feel when they finally launch their novel into the sea of new authors.

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

PS: Only one CAKE was harmed during the writing of this blog.

Think big

Author: Let Readers Read Your Writing

You’ve written a book – a novel. You’ve had friends read it and have received encouraging comments. You could go ahead and publish on Amazon Kindle, Kobo, CreateSpace or Smashwords. (These links take you their publishing pages.)

However, if you’re not quite ready for total exposure you can take advantage of Wattpad – a website that publishes new and old writing a chapter at a time.  You can read another writer’s style and decide whether it is for you, then go look for them in the online book stores. Or you can simply sample and read on – a chapter at a time – the work of authors who appeal.

That sort of dip-in and leave or come-again reading without having to commit any cost is useful in many ways. You can use the talents of others to compare or lift your own writing style.

James Joyce  – masterful writing still

I was able to click into “The Dubliners”, a collection of short stories by James Joyce (now out of copyright). I read Joyce’s story “The Sisters”. It’s written in the style of last century, but what stimulated my writer mind was the subtlety of the revelation of characters. It was not the sisters but the character of the priest which is revealed, hint by hint. Joyce’s use of language, though now apparently old-fashioned, is masterful still.

Wattpad for aspiring authors

Here are a few trending titles on Wattpad right now:

      

The real benefit of Wattpad for an indie author with a completed book is the option you have of uploading your own works to the website (unpaid, of course) and testing out the response of readers. You could actually write your story online in their text editor, but I would urge you to copy and paste into the editor and follow the instructions to upload your story. It’s a great way of testing out the potential popularity for a serial.

Be careful, though, that you’re not infringing any of the rules of the websites where you may want to publish later, e.g. Amazon has strict rules about how much of a work may be published elsewhere if you choose to enrol in the Kindle Direct program and receive higher percentage royalties.

Become an educated author

No I’m not advocating that you go out and spend megabucks on books and writing/publishing or marketing courses. The information is out there and ready for the taking if you are prepared to spend time sifting through the dross. Look for blogs by successful writers – those with more than one book on the online shelves. Here are two I suggest you check out:

  • Non-fiction author Tim Ferriss’ How to Write a Bestselling Book This Year blog. This link to Tim’s blog is littered with other links that will take you to more information. Tim is author of the “Four Hour Workweek”, “The Four Hour Body” and several others in the same vein.
  • Well researched fiction author, Joanna Penn writes at The Creative Penn blog and invites in equally talented authors to talk about the processes they use to make them great. Joanna adds podcasts to her blogs which you an download and listen to at a later date.

slideshow6

Of course, I’d like you to check my own WriteGear Facebook page where I post many links to the results of my research, and you can enrol at my www.writegear.co website to access the long list of how-to writing and publishing videos.

All of these blogs and websites require you to register, but the pay-back for writers who want to learn and succeed will be tremendous.  And who knows? You might even discover new authors you’d like to follow.

In the creative flow – Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

Writing is hard work

WriteGear website

by Amazon Author Heather Sylvawood

When I started writing as a semi-fulltime, professional career, I had this naive idea that the writing would take care of itself and all I’d have to learn was how to market my books.  How wrong could I be (and how right)!

The job of writing

First of all I found that writing doesn’t just flow – not all the time. Sometimes my fingers would fly and out would come the words that conveyed just what I wanted. Other times I would plod along. I realised that a structure, something I could work from when I couldn’t see where the story was going was necessary. It didn’t stop me from having those inspired moments – it simply kept me going when I flagged.

Flagging energy for a story is also something I came across, particularly when I got into novel-length writing. Short stories could be written in a day and then revised at leisure; novels, however, take so much longer. It is so easy to be disheartened along the way.

Professional Writer is an amatuer who didn't quit

Flagging writing moments for me

I found the following moments needed all the perseverance I could muster:

  • About the 5000-6000 word mark (day 2 or 3) – I would look forward and see those miles and miles of words stretching forever into the future. I would wonder if this story was strong enough/interesting enough to continue into a novel-length book.
  • About the 20,000 word – By then my daily word total would have slowed a bit. A 2000 word binge was all I could manage and the enticement for blogging and posting on Facebook was becoming hard to resist.
  • About the 40,000 word mark – I was halfway, yet I looked back and thought how hard the writing had been and I still didn’t know exactly how the story would end. Would it be good enough to warrant another 50,000 words?
  • About the 70,000 word mark – Rolling on to the end. I knew now that I would finish and I couldn’t wait to get there. I found my writing showed the rush – I didn’t ‘milk’ the climax enough; I needed to give my characters their last opportunity to shine. Editing and allowing the climax to happen naturally was vital at the end.
  • About the 80,000 word mark – I knew I was going to get there, it was simply a matter of a couple of days, but I kept getting distracted by my research for my next novel. I would stop and write up my ideas and even the beginning paragraphs as I took breaks in completing the current novel.

But now two are complete – one published: More Than I Could Bear, and a second in editing phase: Family Ties and Rainbow Bonds. And guess what? I’m onto novel three: a sequel to More Than I Could Bear, called A Pearl Among Swine.

Editing my writing

So a story/novel is complete. What next? Edit, edit, edit. It’s a challenge to edit your own work. You have blind spots about your sentence construction and spelling. Especially with my novels I found it was hard to actually ask anyone, including my life partner Tre, to read my work. I didn’t want criticism – I wanted only affirmation.

Heather Sylvawood editing, edfiting, editing

Who wants criticism?

As it turned out Tre was a wonderful critic, but in the end I asked another friend, who had been a proof-reader for a print publisher, to look it through and she came up with many issues neither of us had spotted. Thank-you Karen.

You need the feedback, not just about spelling and punctuation, but for sense. Were those items mentioned in the novel around at the time depicted? Would he/she really have said that? These were questions I had to answer, or alter in my writing, to make the reading experience flow for a reader. Even cross-cultural issues were important to consider in order to allow readers from many backgrounds to understand what was going on.

Marketing your finished writing

Once upon a time print publishers took on this role. If you were a big name you had your printed books on the front tables of every bookshop. If you were a lesser known writer your books would go on the back shelves, spine outward. If you were an unknown writer then you hardly had a chance unless some obscure editor, looking for the next big seller, LOVED your work.

Nowadays Indie or Self-published work allows unknown writers/authors to at least get their titles and front covers on the vast shelves of Amazon, or Kobo or Goodreads (which is being bought by Amazon, by the way).

Heather Sylvawood sample books

The cringe of marketing books

Again I had to overcome a lot of fear to expose my work to the public eye. What if no one liked it? What if no one bought it? I don’t care, at least it’s out there. The reality is a DO CARE. I do want people to read my books and enjoy them – and there’s no reason why they wouldn’t enjoy them, I’ve won short story competitions and had amazing feedback from beta readers and other authors.

My next cringe was whether to ask my friends to help me market my work. Would they think I was spamming them?  Would they get cross at me taking their friendship into the realms of commerce? So far not one of my friends has firebombed my letterbox.

Expert advice

Recently I’ve been reading a number of Kindle books giving advice on publishing and marketing. I’ve become quite adept at telling whether the information they offer is applicable to my situation. One I have to recommend is The Indie Author Power Pack, by various authors including:  David Gaughran , Joanna Penn, Sean Platt , and  Johnny B. Truant .

One of the main messages I have gleaned from this wonderful ideas-dominated book collection is that the only way to move from unknown to well-known is to write – lots of books that  keep hitting the self-publishing  NEW lists and use strategic marketing to keep putting your books in front of your market.  Like all internet marketing success is a case of building your LIST.

So here it is – my published novel

BookCoverMoreThan  More Than I Could Bear

And if you want to get onto my list for notifications of new releases, or reduced-price sales please fill out the form you will find on my web page HERE.

Yours in the Creative Flow – Heather Sylvawood