Category Archives: Print

Finding the Write Road

Musings by Heather Sylvawood

This morning started with a bit of a hiccup – I had a flat battery. The car I am currently driving doesn’t have mod-cons like warning beeps if you turn off the car while the lights are still on. It does, in fact, assume you will be vigilant and remember … duh!

batteryDEAD

Once the battery issue was solved by the nice young man from AA, I set off.

Now I don’t usually drive a manual. Anyone driving behind me could probably tell. I often manage to confuse the slot for third gear with the slot for fifth gear. Consequently I’m either over-revving or stuttering under the strain of a gear jump.

All of these faux pas instantly connect with the blood supply to my face.

Battering my self-confidence

Taking the back route (less chance of shaming myself in front of others), I rattled along, berating myself for every mistake and generally giving my self-confidence I right battering.

Then, in one of those break-through moments, I realised that this is what I do when I’m writing! I leap forward and write heaps, and then I re-read and start to doubt myself, comparing my first draft writing with the polished published writing of others. I compare my least polished with their pristine.

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Recently I have been reading a selection of writers – the series writer, romance writers, mystery writers, New Zealand writers, and Christian writers. I find myself picking up proofing errors (ahhh … the permanency of print against eBooks) and even clumsy language which their editors surely should have noticed. What’s been happening to me is I have been developing my critical eye. Only this time it isn’t for my own work but for that of others.

The Critical Eye is valuable

I am beginning to realise that my over-revving and stuttering gait probably mirrors that of other writers. They too must feel  lacking when comparing themselves to the honoured writers of our culture. That critical eye, however, is what keeps writers improving.

As well as noting the less-than-perfect, the joy of my research is that I am also identifying clever writing.

I recently read Tiger Lillie by Lisa Samson, a Christian writer living in Maryland, USA. I love her style. She manages to convey so much more in simple descriptions and with such humour, I want to come back for more. Take the following example:

“I’ve always loved evening. Even back then, as a chubby, bug-eyed little girl who also loved a good joke, that time of day sobered me and filled me with peace. I know now it’s due to the fact that the clock never stops ticking down and the time for making the day’s mistakes draws to a sweet close. Even the circumstances in which to make these blunders fly away, for in the twilight we simply sit and breathe quietly, cross our fingers and hope the phone won’t ring or the Jehovah’s Witnesses won’t come to the door.”

What craft! How much does she reveal about her character in a passage ostensibly about ‘evening’?

Research good writer and author examples

By reading the work of others I am observing the unusual word construction, the insightful capture of character, and the clever development of plot.

Research is important, be that by reading the work of others, or finding out what is capturing the readers of the day. Writing, however, is the key to becoming a writer. So it’s back to the computer for me.

Oh! Yes. I am writing. A blog!

Heather Sylvawood, Amazon Author

An Opportunity for NZ Authors in Print

NZ Bookshop Day: seeking authors!

Bookshops are keen to have authors in store on NZ Bookshop Day – Saturday October 31. Whether it be a book signing, launch of a new book, a reading, or just dropping in for a chat and an opportunity for book buyers to meet their local authors. This is a great day for authors to connect with their local bookshop. The day has been established to celebrate the great local bookstores in New Zealand.

Bookstores must have their events registered by October 1st in order to join the nation-wide event so if you have a book possibility (signing, give-away, competition idea) get hold of your local NZ bookstore and talk to them about it. To check out the website GO HERE.

Photo Competition

There is also a photo competition for the best picture of someone reading a book anywhere in New Zealand. Check out the competition page here. At risk of disqualifying myself from entering I would like to share this picture of my daughter reading many years ago.

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In the US, May is the month for Indie Bookstores (as opposed to book seller chains) to celebrate authors. Bookshops who participated reported huge increases in foot traffic, so if you’re an author of print books get on the phone and see if you can take advantage of this nation-wide event.

Heather Sylvawood – Amazon Author

Writing is hard work

WriteGear website

by Amazon Author Heather Sylvawood

When I started writing as a semi-fulltime, professional career, I had this naive idea that the writing would take care of itself and all I’d have to learn was how to market my books.  How wrong could I be (and how right)!

The job of writing

First of all I found that writing doesn’t just flow – not all the time. Sometimes my fingers would fly and out would come the words that conveyed just what I wanted. Other times I would plod along. I realised that a structure, something I could work from when I couldn’t see where the story was going was necessary. It didn’t stop me from having those inspired moments – it simply kept me going when I flagged.

Flagging energy for a story is also something I came across, particularly when I got into novel-length writing. Short stories could be written in a day and then revised at leisure; novels, however, take so much longer. It is so easy to be disheartened along the way.

Professional Writer is an amatuer who didn't quit

Flagging writing moments for me

I found the following moments needed all the perseverance I could muster:

  • About the 5000-6000 word mark (day 2 or 3) – I would look forward and see those miles and miles of words stretching forever into the future. I would wonder if this story was strong enough/interesting enough to continue into a novel-length book.
  • About the 20,000 word – By then my daily word total would have slowed a bit. A 2000 word binge was all I could manage and the enticement for blogging and posting on Facebook was becoming hard to resist.
  • About the 40,000 word mark – I was halfway, yet I looked back and thought how hard the writing had been and I still didn’t know exactly how the story would end. Would it be good enough to warrant another 50,000 words?
  • About the 70,000 word mark – Rolling on to the end. I knew now that I would finish and I couldn’t wait to get there. I found my writing showed the rush – I didn’t ‘milk’ the climax enough; I needed to give my characters their last opportunity to shine. Editing and allowing the climax to happen naturally was vital at the end.
  • About the 80,000 word mark – I knew I was going to get there, it was simply a matter of a couple of days, but I kept getting distracted by my research for my next novel. I would stop and write up my ideas and even the beginning paragraphs as I took breaks in completing the current novel.

But now two are complete – one published: More Than I Could Bear, and a second in editing phase: Family Ties and Rainbow Bonds. And guess what? I’m onto novel three: a sequel to More Than I Could Bear, called A Pearl Among Swine.

Editing my writing

So a story/novel is complete. What next? Edit, edit, edit. It’s a challenge to edit your own work. You have blind spots about your sentence construction and spelling. Especially with my novels I found it was hard to actually ask anyone, including my life partner Tre, to read my work. I didn’t want criticism – I wanted only affirmation.

Heather Sylvawood editing, edfiting, editing

Who wants criticism?

As it turned out Tre was a wonderful critic, but in the end I asked another friend, who had been a proof-reader for a print publisher, to look it through and she came up with many issues neither of us had spotted. Thank-you Karen.

You need the feedback, not just about spelling and punctuation, but for sense. Were those items mentioned in the novel around at the time depicted? Would he/she really have said that? These were questions I had to answer, or alter in my writing, to make the reading experience flow for a reader. Even cross-cultural issues were important to consider in order to allow readers from many backgrounds to understand what was going on.

Marketing your finished writing

Once upon a time print publishers took on this role. If you were a big name you had your printed books on the front tables of every bookshop. If you were a lesser known writer your books would go on the back shelves, spine outward. If you were an unknown writer then you hardly had a chance unless some obscure editor, looking for the next big seller, LOVED your work.

Nowadays Indie or Self-published work allows unknown writers/authors to at least get their titles and front covers on the vast shelves of Amazon, or Kobo or Goodreads (which is being bought by Amazon, by the way).

Heather Sylvawood sample books

The cringe of marketing books

Again I had to overcome a lot of fear to expose my work to the public eye. What if no one liked it? What if no one bought it? I don’t care, at least it’s out there. The reality is a DO CARE. I do want people to read my books and enjoy them – and there’s no reason why they wouldn’t enjoy them, I’ve won short story competitions and had amazing feedback from beta readers and other authors.

My next cringe was whether to ask my friends to help me market my work. Would they think I was spamming them?  Would they get cross at me taking their friendship into the realms of commerce? So far not one of my friends has firebombed my letterbox.

Expert advice

Recently I’ve been reading a number of Kindle books giving advice on publishing and marketing. I’ve become quite adept at telling whether the information they offer is applicable to my situation. One I have to recommend is The Indie Author Power Pack, by various authors including:  David Gaughran , Joanna Penn, Sean Platt , and  Johnny B. Truant .

One of the main messages I have gleaned from this wonderful ideas-dominated book collection is that the only way to move from unknown to well-known is to write – lots of books that  keep hitting the self-publishing  NEW lists and use strategic marketing to keep putting your books in front of your market.  Like all internet marketing success is a case of building your LIST.

So here it is – my published novel

BookCoverMoreThan  More Than I Could Bear

And if you want to get onto my list for notifications of new releases, or reduced-price sales please fill out the form you will find on my web page HERE.

Yours in the Creative Flow – Heather Sylvawood